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New Journey … on New Roads

I most often take you down New Journeys on Old Roads, but in April, you can ride with me along some New Roads I’ve never traveled. We can stop and dip our toe in the Atlantic along Florida’s beaches, breathe in the salty magic of the ocean, ponder the history of the struggles of a people, and feed our soul on the blues music of the Deep South. We’ll drive Atlantic Ocean’s 1-A1 Route viewing Florida’s coastal lighthouses. We’ll visit the sprawling Naval Station Norfolk, largest naval station in the world. At the halfway point of the tour, we’ll enter the southern portion of the 2,000 miles of the Appalachian & Allegheny Mountains. Before I bring you back home, we’ll visit FAME Recording Studio in Muscle Shoals AL and see some musical collections in Memphis. But don’t worry…after I drive you out of the Deep South, we’ll celebrate more music in the dazzling and magical Ozark Mountains before we turn south to the Red River and back to TX.

Magical Musical Historical Tour

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Beginning on the Historic Bankhead Highway Route, we’ll leave North TX along I-20 into the East Texas Forests, through Caddo Parish LA along Highway 80 to the Bossier Strip casinos.

 

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We’ll cross the Mississippi River in Vicksburg MS where the river boats roll, and we’ll imagine the captain might be Mark Twain.

Riverboat

Just south of Vicksburg is Natchez, MS. The historic Natchez Trace Parkway is a forest trail extending roughly 440 miles from Nashville, Tennessee, to Natchez, Mississippi, linking the Cumberland (in TN) and Mississippi Rivers.web-Natcheztrl-e1450370163848 (1)

natchez-trace-parkway-mississippi-tennessee4At the point where we pull onto the Trace, you’ll need to be ready to pause & reflect upon one of the harshest exercises of US laws—the Indian Removal Act of 1830. By 1838, over 100,000 Native Americans Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole were forcibly relocated from the rich fertile soil of their ancestral homes in the South to a newly cleared desolate dirt land called “Indian Territory” (present day OK). This “herding” has been called the “Trail of Tears”; more than 15,000 died on the trail.

At the Forks of the Road intersection in Natchez, in the decades before the Civil War, this marketplace was where enslaved Africans were brought from southern plantations to be bought & sold. For this reason, The Trace is sometimes referred to as the “Slavery Trail of Tears.” After arriving in the southern part of the Trace, slaves were marched to the Mississippi River to be placed on barges for delivery to owners. The 13th Amendment ended slavery in the US 1865.

Music Notes in Circle

I can’t be only a history seeker—I must feed my other passion—MUSIC

 

blues music

The most prominent highway in blues lore was U.S. Highway 61. With the advancement of the automobile & national highway system in the 20s & 30s, the blues, jazz & spirituals by African Americans singing about the riverboats, trains & railroads expanded. The sound, too long trapped in the Deep South, moved along this same trail as other historical migrations. From the Birthplace of the Blues in New Orleans, moving northward through Memphis, St. Louis and eventually to St. Paul changing music for centuries to come.

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About 3 hours later, we’ll pull into Selma Alabama, the location of another type of cultural crisis occurring in the 20th century playing out in an ugly horrific scene on March 7, 1965. Known as “Bloody Sunday,” African-Americans seeking voting rights crossed Edmund Pettus Bridge to walk to the capitol in Montgomery. They were met by law enforcement on foot and horseback blocking the way off the bridge; many were beaten including now-congressman John Lewis. By March 21st, accompanied by the Alabama National Guard under federal command, the march was peacefully completed once again led by John Lewis and joined by Martin Luther King Jr., Coretta Scott King and Andrew Young. In August 1965 President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Voting Act.

The next stop on this Magical Musical Historical Tour is St. Augustine FL. I’ve never traveled to FL so I picked this scenic city with a rich history.

Founded in 1565 by Spanish explorers, St. Augustine is the oldest continuously inhabited European-established settlement within the borders of the continental United States.  Its prominence and location made it ripe for trade & settlement but also a target for invaders and pirates. The territory suffered through multiple turmoil during its history including marauding European Empires’ explorers, Civil War Confederacy, the Civil Rights Violence, and persistent developers trying to quickly buy it up as the “winter haven” for the northern rich.

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St. Augustine Lighthouse

The scenic drive along the Southeastern Coast’s A-1A features numerous lighthouses–a landmark I try to visit in all my travels.

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When we leave St. Augustine by way of US Highway 17, I’ll do my best to not get lost as we cross rivers, inlets and bays tracking along the shore for most of its 1,000 miles parallel to I-95 from Punta Gorda, Florida to Winchester, Virginia. We’ll cover some 665 miles through places which are little more than a small country road, while in others it’s a main thoroughfare. I’ve identified some 15 bridges along the way…and may I say this is a “challenge” for me!

We’ll visit the sprawling Naval Station, the largest Navy station in the world, supporting 75 ships & 134 aircraft alongside – 14 piers and 11 aircraft hangars housing the largest concentration of US Navy forces. The air operations conduct nearly 300 flights a day on average totaling over 100,000 arrivals/departures each year.

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110715-N-QY430-162 NORFOLK (July 15, 2011) The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) arrives at Naval Station Norfolk, Va., after a six-month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Rafael Martie/Released)                                                                    [used from Navy Times public photos]

90 miles southeast of Richmond VA, Norfolk is about 18 miles from the Atlantic Ocean near the popular beach town of Virginia Beach bordered by Chesapeake Bay and Hampton Road Harbor.

thNU3Z0YYRFamily Time – where life begins and love never ends 

(unknown author but I’ve decided to make it mine!)

I’m spending some time with my new great granddaughter. She’s a big part of this journey–pretty good reason.

After a while, we’ll say our goodbyes and I’ll begin a NW route where we’ll encounter the Appalachian Mountains, the Shenandoah River and into the Monongahela National Forest. The Forest comprises 1/3 of the Allegheny Mountains, and, as such, part of the Appalachian Range forming the East Continent Divide.

Family Time – where life begins and love never ends 

In Elkins I’ll visit with my son & daughter-in-law who live on a piece of beautiful property backed up to the Monongahela National Forest with their horses & cats. Some TX sized stories will be shared and then I’ll load up for the SW run to TN.

The city of Knoxville is one of the gateways to the Great Smokey Mountain National Park, its location at the confluence of three major rivers in the Tennessee Valley brought flat boat and steamboat traffic creating one of the South Eastern’s merchandising areas. Between the ridge-valley of the Appalachian Mountains and Cumberland Plateau, Chattanooga is called the “Scenic City.

thNHDRWRNT…a musical note here…city made famous in the 1941 song “Chattanooga Choo Choo by Glenn Miller. (if you don’t know or just want to hear again, here’s the song).

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=video+of+chattanooga+cho+cho+tex+beneke&&view=detail&mid=F64F71C592EC889C0AC7F64F71C592EC889C0AC7&&FORM=VRDGA

What is THE MUSCLE SHOALS SOUND?

It won’t surprise you that my Magical Musical Historical Tour calls for a detour here in Northern AL.  It has been said of this lonely-looking building there is a quiet magic in the air. There are tours of this iconic studio so I’m going to experience the magic! FAME_Recording_Studios_Muscle_Shoals

Artists from the Deep South and some from outside the South gathered with the local musicians to create their own sound at FAME (Florence Alabama Music Enterprise).

Detroit rocker Bob Seger’s signature song — “Old Time Rock ‘n’ Roll” — began as a demo tape at the Muscle Shoals Sound Studio. An engineer’s mistake gave the song its distinctive da-da-da intro. Seger liked the sound and kept it in the final song.

Over the years, some of the artists who recorded at Muscle Shoals Sound Studio included The Rolling Stones, Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, Willie Nelson, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Joe Cocker, Levon Helm, Paul Simon, Bob Seger, Rod Stewart, Cat Stevens, Elton John, Boz Scaggs, Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan, Dr. Hook, Julian Lennon, Oak Ridge Boys, Cher, Alman Brothers, and Glenn Frey

I could talk music all day, but I’ll leave you with a couple sites you can visit for more details.

http://muscleshoalssmalltownbigsound.com/

https://www.npr.org/2003/09/20/1437161/the-legendary-muscle-shoals-sound

Bet I’ll be singing some of those great songs recorded at FAME as I turn NW out of AL headed to a sundown in one of the most beautiful river towns in the Deep South—defined as a region stretching from Memphis TN in the north to Vicksburg MS in the south and from Helena AR in the west to the Yazoo River in the east. I’ll be entering the city on part of the Blues Highway 51 that carries the name of the undisputed King of Rock ‘n Roll Elvis Presley Blvd. Highway 51, a north/south terminus, runs parallel with Highway 61 visited in the beginning of this tourMississippi-River-Memphis-Tennessee-620x413

There is no other thing that captures my mind and soul like music. That’s why I keep coming back to revisit the “never-since-replicated” music of the 50s & 60s. Not only is it part of my “coming of age” timeline, but these songs form the base of my musical interests. You’ll remember we began this Magical Musical Historical Tour on the Mississippi & Blues Highway 61. We now come back to visit more of the sounds of the Delta.

This will set the tone for the places I’ll walk:

https://www.bing.com/search?q=walking+in+memphis+video&PC=U316&FORM=CHROMN

Scholars disagree as to whether there is a substantial musicological difference between blues that originated in the Mississippi Delta and blues from other parts of the country. They note the defining characteristics of Delta blues are instrumentation and an emphasis on rhythm; the songs are typically expressed in the first person and often concern love, sex, the traveling, lifestyle, life’s tribulations, sin, salvation and death.

The list of musicians who got their start in Memphis reads like a Who’s Who of  music royalty.  Led by “the King” you can add Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, Roy Orbison Booker T & the MGs, Otis Redding, Isaac Hayes, Al Green, Percy Sledge, Sam & Dave and B.B. King.

There are so many landmarks to visit, I’ll just mention a few:

  • Beale Street (national historical landmark);
  • Sam Phillips’ Sun Studio;
  • Stax Records (soul sound grittier than Motown);
  • Graceland;
  • Heartbreak Hotel;

I’m taking a tour of the Rock & Soul Museum; here is their site for details. You may want to make the museum part of your next trip.

https://www.memphisrocknsoul.org/exhibits

 

memphisWhile lost in my thoughts and the tunes of blues, I must not forget Memphis is home to Tennessee’s largest African-American population and played a prominent role in the American Civil Rights Movement. The city on the Mississippi was the site of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr’s assassination at the Loraine Motel. The city hosts the National Civil Rights Museum, a Smithsonian affiliate institution. There is also an outside museum at the Loraine Motel.

I’ll make my final crossing over the Mississippi as I leave out of Memphis, taking a NW road through the Mark Twain National Forest on Highway 60. That day’s journey will bring me to Branson MO.

It’s been called a “Nashville in the Ozarks” first developed in the 1960s, the theaters of Branson abound with various musical shows, revues & good food on the lake. Theaters bear the names of heavy weights in the industry: Andy Williams Moon River, Glen Campbell Goodtime, Roy Clark, Oak Ridge Boys, Wayne Newton, Ray Stevens, Mel Tillis, Osmond Brothers, Lawrence Welk Orchestra, and Bobby Vinton Blue Velvet.

No matter how I love the music, nothing can surpass the allure of the mist on the Ozarks. Mountains, I hear your song!Ozarks

This Texan always feels the flat lands of OK/TX calling me home. A turn southwest out of the Ozarks leads you across that territory I first mentioned called “Indian Territory”  My grandfather was born there before it became the state of OK.

But we’re not through with rivers yet. We will cross the Arkansas, a major tributary of the Mississippi River flowing east/southeast across Arkansas and Oklahoma. At 1,469 miles (2,364 km), it is the sixth-longest river in the US & the second-longest tributary in the Mississippi-Missouri system…and the 45th longest river in the world.

I know the last river I’ll cross is the one mentioned in the songs of “Western Swing” and “Cowboy Songs” my daddy sang.

Waylon Jennings sings about that place in his lyrics:

But when you cross that ol’ Red River hoss, That just don’t mean a thing

Once you’re down in Texas, Bob Wills is still the King

Crossing the Red River joining OK/TX makes my heart beat a little faster, my feet feel more solid, and draws my gaze to the sparce vegetation. We’ll quickly begin to see a line of 200-300 ft wind turbines utilizing all the wind-swept vastness of these plains.

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 Magical Musical Historical Tour

As a seeker of history, I must remain open to other’s stories and other’s experiences. That is the only way we humans can mend our differences and understand what happens around us.

The musical portion is not a side “note” for me but an integral part of my being. I listen to music not only for the beat or rhythm but for the depth of someone’s soul displayed in the sounds of words or relationship of the notes & chords that come forth.

If you have visited some of these areas, please let me know of your experience. I’ll come back to this post and give you some highlights of thisCwxbghaWgAAvExO[1]

 

Note: please read my comment policy under “My Rules”

Believe

There was never a night or a problem that could defeat sunrise or hope.

Bern Williams

Angels are like lighthouses passing by in the storms

Karen Goldman

 

 

 

Back When

Drive me back to yesterday and

let’s remember when

dreams were big and we were young

the way it was back then.

We’ll dance to the songs on the radio

and laugh with all our friends

remembering a simple time

the way it was back then.

.thVJ3Y0XE6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Help! I GOT LOST

It happens to all of us sooner or later…more or less frequently. We think we’ll just toss out the map and not even use the GPS directions. “Of course I know the way.” “I can find it in my sleep.” “No, I’m not lost…I’m just not there yet.”

Then it happens! You have to slow down, lower your head, breathe deeply and clear your mind.  Well, isn’t that why I’m lost…because I cleared my mind!

I hear myself whispering to myself:

I could have found the location if they hadn’t built all those houses and stores.

Of course, I know how to get there even if they’ve changed the road.

Yes, it’s a familiar road but when did they build the new highway that goes the wrong direction?

That’s what life is about.

Change. Progress. Update. Different. New.

Why do those things bother me so much?

In this space, I offer you a look at New Journeys on Old Roads.  It’s more to me than that.  It’s the place I throw my thoughts on a blank page.  Come along.  We’ll find it together.  I’m back on track.

“The real voyage of discovery consists in not seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes” Marcel Proust

 

 

Texas ~ The Way I See It

MILE MARKER 1

YOU ARE INVITED

…to travel with me across some of the 268,820 square miles of TX over the next few months. The contrasting topography with its wide-open spaces, mountains, hills and valleys, river boundaries, and shorelines (longer than either SC or NC) defines the State of Texas.  Its unique “shape” marked by jagged edges, curves and straight lines is internationally recognized.

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A BRIEF HISTORY 

Multiple incursions and battles between Native Americans, settlers, frontiersmen, soldiers and conquerors established, refined and changed Texas. Long after half of the United States was settled with stable growth, Texas fought for and won its independence from Mexico in 1836[1].  Known for its “independent” attitude and spirit, Texas cannot help but  be a product of its upbringing.

Texas history doesn’t fit easily into a timeline or narrative because Texas has had many frontiers and a collection of settlers broader than most states. The story of Texas was still in its formation and infancy when missionaries, explorers, ranchers, immigrants, tradesmen and families pushed into the regions of the canyons along the Rio Grande River, the bayous along the Gulf of Mexico, East to the Sabine River and Piney Woods, and North to the Red River ultimately harnessing the vast arid land of the Panhandle Plains.

ONE TEXAS TRAVELER  

Traveling back roads and lesser known towns often provide the untold story or long-forgotten history. These posted segments are NOT intended to be an official Travelogue or History record.  I’m simply a TEXAS TRAVELER who is intrigued by the geography of Texas and compelled to peek in on some of the dusty old corners of Texas courthouses and buildings. Through the Texas Historical Commission’s Courthouse Preservation Program and Main Street Cities[2], travelers have available to the them revitalized downtown areas offering restaurants, businesses, shops, museums, and historic buildings and architecture.

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Left: Chisholm Trail sign, Decatur, TX; Middle: Majestic Theatre, Eastland TX; Right: Main Street, Junction TX

Hopefully you’ll discover something new about Texas or find a place you’d like to visit. Come back soon for new information and photos. I will be posting various sources and references for travel to or within the State of Texas. Some travel tips will direct you to a specific historic site, an Interstate road or multiple paths to get you from here to there.  But just as intriguing are the off-road experiences when you leave the bypass and head to the “historic downtown.” You never know who you’ll meet in the city square with a monument to their memory.

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Maybe you’ll find your own reason to travel~

Perhaps you share the same wandering spirit I possess.

                 Don’t need a map to get there—

                 you  can get there from anywhere

                 when you’re going in your head.[3]

DISCOVERING  THE STORY 

Whose name is on that building? And is the year scripted in stone when it was built?  What exactly is in a name?  Proprietors once had their name proudly displayed on the building’s façade, or in other cases, they had it set in tile at the building’s entrance.  That street has an unusual name.  Why is the street sign in German?  A lot of the names are Hispanic.  Was that an old depot?  There’s always a story.

Here is part of mine.

  • I was born in a small town in West Texas called Eastland (see how that works?)
  • I even grew up in a small town in South Texas – Clute.
  • I recently revisited Abilene (medium-sized town in West Texas where I lived in 60s-70s)
  • After years of living in Ft. Worth, I found another small town in which to retire.

Small towns have a uniqueness that can be either loved or loathed. You know there’s no Starbucks™ and the chain restaurants are limited or nonexistent.  The high school sports and activities bring out the entire community limiting when the town’s businesses close down on Friday nights.  You’ll see monuments to veterans of various wars.  You may arrive just as the parade begins (and you don’t even know why there is a parade!) There is probably more than one festival or celebration each year. In the county seats of government, you’ll find the “old courthouse” either serving as current business for the county or maybe standing only as a museum or historic site now.  It’s not uncommon to see US flags staked and waving in the wind or booths set up around the square.

WP_20150506_15_22_52_Pro  20160227_142106WP_20150506_13_58_40_ProWP_20150506_13_59_58_ProWP_20150506_13_58_21_Pro(Left to Right: Jackson County, Edna; Hood County, Granbury; 3, 4 & 5 Wharton County, Wharton)
Left to Right: Jackson County, Edna; Hood County, Granbury; next 3 Wharton County, Wharton

Don’t be surprised if there are antique cars parked around the courthouse square. If you love small-town living, you’ve found your paradise because those town squares still exist.  If you want to be amid the hustle and bustle of business, trade and entertainment, you’re probably happier in the city.

I enjoy trading the comforts of a city for the local café with its mismatched dishes. I feel comfortable in small towns so that is where I began and continue my story of adventure. More than a year ago, I set out on a mission of traveling old roads as part of my conceptualized blog –

 NEW JOURNEYS ON OLD ROADS

Those words described the revolution within myself. I was moving from some health issues to a more normal and peaceful place. Blessed beyond my expectations, I was able to retire, and found I could return to traveling and discovering.  I became much more confident so I set out to mark my new journeys.  I didn’t know how many miles that idea would include.  If you’ve traveled here with me before, you know Music is my Second Language; therefore many of my travels are woven into and scheduled around concerts, live performances, bands and oprys.

Many of the towns I put on my list to visit were remembered from my Daddy’s stories—he had traveled EVERYWHERE! My mother gave me insight into some of the little farm towns or the oilfield towns of the 30s, 40s, 50s.  My grandparents were travelers, too. They often traveled to CA. How far was that? I wondered.

COUNTY COURTHOUSES

As a second thought – but maybe because I’m a lover of history – I started looking at courthouses.  Those old buildings, with both new and innovative architectural designs, seem to be standing not so much as a beacon of activity and business but more as a starting point to see how the Texas residents, settlers, landowners and government representatives designed the past to shape its future.

Texas was settled with immigrants from Germany, Austria, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Mexico, South American countries and Baltic States as well as the African-Americans here as slaves and the Native Americans (estimated around 50 tribes in the region.

These original immigrant founders constructed what they had seen in the Classical Revival, the Romanesque or imagined other architectural styles. I find all architecture design intriguing (even if some of these historic sites are a bit ugly). The blending of many cultures is evident in the architecture, town names, or artwork in Texas.

WP_20150523_13_40_03_ProHood County, Granbury Texas, Second Empire with Romanesque.
WP_20151125_14_02_31_ProBurleson County Courthouse, Caldwell, Classical Revival

 

THE TRAIL’S ENDth[8] (2)

The State found itself looking for methods to rebuild war-torn Texas after the Civil War. Other than crops (impossible to grow in some regions of Texas), stock trade became the primary means of trade and livelihood bringing about the well-known history of the “cowboy” life style. Brahman cattle were imported from India, and the Longhorn breed was specific to Spanish settlement.  Early cattle drives were initiated by Nelson Story and Charles Goodnight.  Cattle were driven across the Chisholm and other trails to railheads (i.e., Abilene KS/Dodge City KS/Ft. Worth TX).

Life on the open range changed forever with the invention of barbed wire. Fences, combined with the back to back killer winters of 1886 and 1887, changed the cattle industry.

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The need for water for stock and way stations for people/goods traveling the stagecoach and pony express routes created stopovers and towns simply for the need of water. I’ll introduce you to some of these towns in later segments. Many of the original routes are preserved today as a testament to the harshness of Texas and the strength of those who shaped it.  Once Texas roads served to provide wealth and distribution of product.  Now some roads lead you through towns in major decline.  These roads have witnessed the new highways and interstates and re-routed railroads all whispering the cycles of boom and bust telling the story through generations of the land and its people.

Not only the geography and climate of TX reflects the differences, but the ways in which towns grew to cities and rural turned to urban.

TEXANS

thOW6YB2LFA traveler to Texas should never make an assumption that all of Texas has oil wells, cattle, gun-toting citizens or cowboy hats. Yes, you will absolutely find those, but you’ll find the folks in business suits handling the business of oil/gas production, real estate and financial services.  You will definitely see the workers in the oil/gas fields wearing flame resistant coveralls and covered in dirt and mud. But you’ll also witness advanced technology utilized by oilfield crews.

You’ll see many Texans devoted to the fine arts with world-class music, art and design displayed in the performance halls and museums, community theatres and town centers across the state. Hundreds of universities and colleges with various concentration (i.e., Technical, Liberal Arts, Science & Health, Agricultural & Energy) are preparing tomorrow’s workers, owners and educators for an ever-growing Texas which should be able to rise & develop future energy systems as well as advancements in science health and product development.

Left: WagnerNoël PAC Midland/Odessa TX; Right: Bass Hall, Ft. Worth TX

 

Reference notes: 

[1] http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h306.html

[2] Texas Historical Commission www.texastimetravel.com the.state.tx.us (512) 463-6100 c. 2014.

[3] Lyrics to Ozark Mountain Jubilee recorded by The Oak Ridge Boys; Songwriters: SCOTT ANDERS, ROGER MURRAH © EMI Music Publishing, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group; Release 1983.

_____________________

To begin your Texas travel journey, visit:

www.texastimetravel.com

Texas State Travel Guide is a comprehensive directory for all the elements of your Texas adventure. www.TravelTex.com

_______________________________

NEXT SEGMENT:  MILE MARKER 2

Future segments:

How to Visit Small Town, Texas

Texas Roads – from dirt to Interstate

Geographical Regions – Climate & Energy

Travel Regions Highlighting Historic Sites

County Courthouse Stories

Town & Cities & People

Cultural Influence & Festivals

Mysteries & Ghost Towns

Interesting Facts About Texas

 

BLESSED

Time for inventory.

I’ve checked and double-checked.  I have so many blessings–I need to give some away.

What a beautiful place to be in your life.

THANK YOU FOR TRAVELING WITH ME!

Back to the Beginning

I had the chance to drive through my birthplace a few days ago.  Does anyone know what you are supposed to feel when you re-visit the past?  I didn’t have a plan or a place to put that experience.  But when you arrive, you might as well see it all.

It’s just Small Town, Texas.  It has the obligatory “old” post office, the usual run-down Main street, and more than one place that is older than me!  The highways leading to it are either farms, crops growing or dying from drought, “fracking” for natural gas sites or oil wells pumping. The land is so flat you truly can see for miles!WP_20150114_09_35_39_Pro

I felt a little warm hug when I turned off the Interstate and saw that “welcome to” sign.  It’s not like I was raised there–only first grade then we moved.  But I am sure I saw some shadows around the old theatre and the original hotel of folks who had lived there longer than I’ve been alive.  Those kind of towns don’t change much.  They don’t usually have a Starbucks or a dozen choices of drive thru restaurants.  They still conduct business at the courthouse on the town square.  There are still a few stores operating on the perimeter of the square.  And they usually have a “town opry” or a “fairgrounds”or at least a “city park” or “town square.”WP_20150114_09_56_25_ProWP_20150114_09_59_37_Pro

Not sure what I expected to do on that short drive through town.  But it did make me feel grateful that some things, like Small Town, Texas, still exist.  They make good places to drive into and out of taking just a little piece of memory.  Most of the tour around town was more in my mind than through my camera lens.  I probably can’t explain what I felt to anyone, but then, they are my own memories. So glad I took that turn off the fast lane.

Back to the Interstate, set the cruise control, and head on toward more flat land in west Texas.

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Is there a town like this in your past? Hope you have a chance to re-visit and reminisce.  WP_20150114_10_15_29_Pro

Don’t Miss the Chance

 

It is often hard to distinguish between the hard knocks in life and those of opportunity. ~Frederick Phillips

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Seize every opportunity along the way, for how sad it would be if the road you chose became the road not taken. ~Robert Brault

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A pessimist is one who makes difficulties of his opportunities and an optimist is one who makes opportunities of his difficulties. ~Harry Truman

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Grasp your opportunities, no matter how poor your health; nothing is worse for your health than boredom. ~Mignon McLaughlin

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Traveling With Me

 

Today is the first anniversary of this blog, so I wanted to let you know I appreciate your spending time here.

If you’ve been traveling with me for the last year, THANK YOU for hopping on board.

If you are reading this post and visiting this blog for the first time,  WELCOME to my journey. 

 I’m reminded about the message of love I gave my children:th3US0WZ7J

If I could write a blueprint for living, I would wrap it in love, tie it with ribbons of hugs & present it to you anytime you need to be reminded you are God’s child.”

I hope my message has been clear, both to my children & grandchildren.  I believe in treasuring the wonderful times & even the troubled days…for how can you know you are blessed if you haven’t seen the other side. 

To say that I’m in my second “life” would be an understatement…I’m living again and maybe fully for the first time…but I can clearly see it’s right for this time.

When I retired, I wasn’t exactly sure what I was going to do.  I thought my purpose was over.  Now I’m finally understanding that I am here EVERY DAY for a purpose.  It has amazed me the people who have followed my blog or tweets who connect because of a comparable belief, thought or interest.  I never imagined some of those casual contacts would become true friends across the miles – but that’s what has happened.  I didn’t imagine either that old acquaintances would re-visit me emerging from this new tool.

I’m honored to hear from my readers with comments such as:

  • “I needed your thought today” 
  • “Thank you for caring”
  • “ Welcome to my world”
  • “Hope to meet you”
  • “Good to see your post”

With a dream in my heart, I knew it was time to live it! Nothing fades faster than an opportunity not explored.  Writing has been my passion, so I began this journey one year ago. It is here on these blank pages I can pour out my thoughts, beliefs, ideas & words.  It has become my peaceful place to offer a word of encouragement or a lesson learned in my life. 

Having come through some health issues, daily I’m grateful I’m still standing upright & even standing!  I’m really careful about where I step, walk & things I do…but for the most part…I’m trekking down paths I never thought I would be able to explore.

New Journeys on Old Roads has become more than just a title for my blog; it has come to describe my life more than I ever imagined. 

  • Sometimes the roads are rough, so I slow down and approach with caution. 
  • Sometimes they have detours, so I look for an alternate route. 
  • Sometimes they are brand new black-topped roads over what used to be dirt, so I speed up a bit. 
  • Sometimes I get lost…but I get out my map, connect to my GPS, and try again…a lot like what happens when you fall down or fail.

If something I’ve presented here has been helpful, I invite you to post a comment or contact me in other methods listed here on this blog.

THANK YOU FOR TRAVELING WITH ME ON  MY 

NEW JOURNEYS ON OLD ROADS!

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Understanding Yourself

This is what I want from now on:

a slower pace~

a more centered existence~

and the feelings of perfect happiness to be found

in the moments I come home to myself.”

Linda Weltner

 

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ultimatemindsettoday

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GOD'S POETIC CHILD!!!

Dear Reader, I am here to give you a little taste of poetry with some water on the side. When you come on my blog that's all that you will taste is Poetry. Not the type of poetry where it doesn't have a meaning. The type of poetry where you will be inspired, uplifted and you will have a different mindset once you leave this site. You might even come to get a taste of this poetry again. Don't be afraid to let your kids read this blog. My poetry is for and to help the youth. Bring them along with you. You both are scrolling down your phone or on the computer anyway. Let's have fun and get a taste of some poetry. I promise this type of poetry tastes delicious. Grab a plate and a fork and I'll feed you. ENJOY!!!!

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